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Full Freeview on the Rowridge (Isle Of Wight, England) transmitter

first published this on - UK Free TV
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The symbol shows the location of the Rowridge (Isle Of Wight, England) transmitter which serves 620,000 homes. The bright green areas shown where the signal from this transmitter is strong, dark green areas are poorer signals. Those parts shown in yellow may have interference on the same frequency from other masts.

This transmitter has no current reported problems

The BBC and Digital UK report there are no faults or engineering work on the Rowridge (Isle Of Wight, England) transmitter.

Choose from three options: ■ List by multiplex ■ List by channel number ■ List by channel name
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Which Freeview channels does the Rowridge transmitter broadcast?

If you have any kind of Freeview fault, follow this Freeview reset procedure first.

Digital television services are broadcast on a multiplexes (or Mux) where many stations occupy a single broadcast frequency, as shown below.

MuxH/VFrequencyHeightModeWatts
PSB1
BBCA
 V max
 H max
C24 (498.0MHz)
320mDTG-200,000W
200,000W
Channel icons
1 BBC One (SD) South, 2 BBC Two England, 9 BBC Four, 23 BBC Three, 201 CBBC, 202 CBeebies, 231 BBC News, 232 BBC Parliament, 250 BBC Red Button, plus 16 others

PSB2
D3+4
 V max
 H max
C27 (522.0MHz)
320mDTG-200,000W
200,000W
Channel icons
3 ITV 1 (SD) (Meridian (South Coast micro region)), 4 Channel 4 (SD) South ads, 5 Channel 5, 6 ITV 2, 10 ITV3, 13 E4, 14 Film4, 15 Channel 4 +1 South ads, 18 More4, 26 ITV4, 30 E4 +1, 35 ITV1 +1 (Meridian south coast),

PSB3
BBCB
 V max
 H max
C21+ (474.2MHz)
320mDTG-200,000W
200,000W
Channel icons
56 5SELECT, 101 BBC One HD (England no regional news), 102 BBC Two HD (England), 103 ITV 1 HD (ITV Meridian Southampton), 104 Channel 4 HD South ads, 105 Channel 5 HD, 106 BBC Four HD, 109 BBC Three HD, 204 CBBC HD, 205 CBeebies HD, plus 1 others

COM4
SDN
 H -6dB
 V -6dB
C25 (506.0MHz)
299mDTG-850,000W
50,000W
Channel icons
20 Drama, 21 5USA, 29 ITV2 +1, 32 5STAR, 33 5Action, 41 Legend, 42 GREAT! movies action, 46 Channel 5 +1, 58 ITVBe +1, 59 ITV3 +1, 64 Blaze, 67 CBS Reality, 74 Dave ja vu, 78 TCC, 81 Blaze +1, 89 ITV4 +1, 203 CITV, 208 Pop Player, 209 Ketchup TV, 210 Ketchup Too, 211 YAAAS!, plus 15 others

COM5
ArqA
 H -6dB
 V -6dB
C22+ (482.2MHz)
302mDTG-850,000W
50,000W
Channel icons
11 Sky Arts, 17 Really, 19 Dave, 31 E4 Extra, 36 pick, 40 Quest Red, 43 Food Network, 47 Film4 +1, 48 Challenge, 49 4seven, 57 Smithsonian Channel, 60 Drama +1, 70 Quest +1, 75 Yesterday +1, 83 Together TV, 233 Sky News, plus 9 others

COM6
ArqB
 H -6dB
 V -6dB
C28 (530.0MHz)
302mDTG-850,000W
50,000W
Channel icons
12 Quest, 25 W, 27 Yesterday, 34 GREAT! movies, 39 DMAX, 44 HGTV, 71 Quest Red +1, 73 HobbyMaker, 82 Talking Pictures TV, 84 PBS America, 88 Classic Hits, 235 Al Jazeera Eng, plus 19 others

LSO
 H -13dB
C37 (602.0MHz)299mDTG-1210,000W
Channel icons
from 22nd December 2014: 7 That's Solent,

DTG-8 64QAM 8K 3/4 27.1Mb/s DVB-T MPEG2
DTG-12 QSPK 8K 3/4 8.0Mb/s DVB-T MPEG2
H/V: aerial position (horizontal or vertical)

Which BBC and ITV regional news can I watch from the Rowridge transmitter?

regional news image
BBC South Today 1.3m homes 4.9%
from Southampton SO14 7PU, 26km north (354°)
to BBC South region - 39 masts.
regional news image
ITV Meridian News 0.9m homes 3.6%
from Whiteley PO15 7AD, 24km north-northeast (20°)
to ITV Meridian (South Coast) region - 39 masts.
All of lunch, weekend and 50% evening news is shared with all of Meridian plus Oxford

Are there any self-help relays?

Portsmouth DocksTransposer2 km N city centre50 homes Estimate. Group of houses'

How will the Rowridge (Isle Of Wight, England) transmission frequencies change over time?

1950s-80s1984-971997-981998-20122012-132 May 2018
VHFA K TA K TA K TA K TW T
C3BBCtvwaves
C21C4wavesC4wavesC4waves+BBCBBBCB
C22+ArqAArqA
C24BBC2wavesBBC2wavesBBC2wavesBBCABBCA
C25SDNSDN
C27ITVwavesITVwavesITVwavesD3+4D3+4
C28ArqBArqB
C29LSO
C31BBC1wavesBBC1wavesBBC1wavescom7
C37com8
C55tv_offcom7tv_off
C56tv_offCOM8tv_off

tv_off Being removed from Freeview (for 5G use) after November 2020 / June 2022 - more
Table shows multiplexes names see this article;
green background for transmission frequencies
Notes: + and - denote 166kHz offset; aerial group are shown as A B C/D E K W T
waves denotes analogue; digital switchover was 7 Mar 12 and 21 Mar 12.

How do the old analogue and currrent digital signal levels compare?

Analogue 1-4 500kW
PSB1||, PSB1≡, PSB2||, PSB2≡, PSB3||, PSB3≡(-4dB) 200kW
COM4≡, COM4||, COM5≡, COM5||, COM6≡, COM6||(-10dB) 50kW
com7≡(-13.1dB) 24.4kW
Mux 1*, Mux 2*, Mux A*, Mux B*, Mux C*, Mux D*(-14dB) 20kW
com8≡(-14.3dB) 18.4kW
LSO≡(-17dB) 10kW

Which companies have run the Channel 3 services in the Rowridge transmitter area

Aug 1958-Jan 1992Southern Television
Jan 1982-Dec 1992Television South (TVS)
Jan 1993-Feb 2004Meridian
Feb 2004-Dec 2014ITV plc
Feb 1983-Dec 1992TV-am•
Jan 1993-Sep 2010GMTV•
Sep 2010-Dec 2014ITV Daybreak•
• Breakfast ◊ Weekends ♦ Friday night and weekends † Weekdays only. Rowridge was not an original Channel 3 VHF 405-line mast: the historical information shown is the details of the company responsible for the transmitter when it began transmitting Channel 3.

Comments
Sunday, 17 February 2013
Dave Lindsay
sentiment_very_satisfiedPlatinum

3:08 AM

Roy Barton: A yagi wideband is not a good idea for a Group A transmitter.

Log periodic aerials have very flat gain curves and therefore the same issue does not apply; they are fine. See:

Rowridge Transmitter

Using the aerial amplifier is fine. It needs to be as close to the aerial as possible because it will be amplifying the noise picked up in the aerial lead, which is what you don't want (poorer snr). See:

Television Aerial Boosters / Amplifiers, Splitters, Diplexers & Triplexers

If you have a Group A aerial, then you should re-orientate it for vertical polarisation. A wideband aerial isn't necessary (over that of a Group A one) because all of Rowridge's channels are within Group A.

link to this comment
Dave Lindsay's 5,724 posts GB
Dave Lindsay
sentiment_very_satisfiedPlatinum

3:44 AM

Roy Barton: Here is a plot of the terrain between you and the transmitter:


Terrain between ( m a.g.l.) and (antenna m a.g.l.) - Optimising UK DTT Freeview and Radio aerial location


You will note that one mile away, the ground obscures line-of-sight. This corresponds to Holt Heath.

Therefore, your task is to receive what is "coming over" the brow. (Imagine if it were a light.) As far as the COMs go, you may have to contend with interference from Stockland Hill's COMs, which are co-channel.

You are only 28 miles away; that said, we don't know how the COMs might have restriction WRT the PSBs, in your direction. The Digital UK Coverage Checker suggests that they may be a bit inferior to the PSBs. The predicted figures are that one third of Rowridge viewers won't get the COMs, so they must be inferior in some way.

Obviously, with Stockland being in the opposite direction, the reflector is important WRT blocking interference.


As I say, I would start by changing the existing aerial to vertical polarisation and take it from there. Only then will you know whether it is sufficient to pull in the COMs or not.

link to this comment
Dave Lindsay's 5,724 posts GB
Tuesday, 19 February 2013
R
Roy Barton
12:59 PM

Roy Barton:
John Lindsay. I really do appreciate the detail in your answers. I have checked with the manufacturers of my wideband aerial (not yet fitted). It is a labgear LAB450/WS

Labgear

They say it is not a Yagi, but when pressed they said it was based upon a Yagi but having 3 booms they say it was strictly not a Yagi. They went on to say as regards a log periodic it would perform as well as a group A on channel 28 where we have the problem. Some local stockists only stock wideband, but one distributor offers just one item in Group A, and it less than 25% of the cheapest wideband. Labgear only manufacture wideband.
You have made it clear what I should do. I will try to get a refund on the wideband and fit the cheap group A on vertical polarisation. To me this seems to be an aerial jungle. I would appreciate your comment. LAB450/WS is it worth messing with? (BH217DX)

link to this comment
Roy Barton's 13 posts GB
Dave Lindsay
sentiment_very_satisfiedPlatinum

1:46 PM

Roy Barton: As you say, the tri-boom aerial is based on the yagi principle: there is a dipole, which is the active part (the bit that the cable connects onto), and elements whose purpose is to focus the signal onto the dipole. The elements are connected electrically to the cable.

With a yagi there are a number of factors which result in it being a compromise to make it more sensitive across the whole band at the expense of a level gain curve.

With a log periodic there is a double-boom. The cable connects across the two booms at the transmitter-facing end and the boom are connected together at the mast end. Each element acts to receive at a particular frequency.

I wouldn't bother with the tri-boom wideband. Don't buy a crappy contract aerial either. If you get a log then wideband is fine because their gain curves are much flatter than yagis.

There are plenty of aerial suppliers online selling the aerials that the professionals fit. No longer do you have to rely on what the DIY shops sell.

If you were using an aerial horizontally, have you tried turning it vertical?

Just going back to your original posting, have you checked the cable for signs of damage and water ingress? This could perhaps be chafing on guttering on guttering or a roof tile.

I'm not a professional, but at 28 miles, and just out of line-of-sight approximately 1 mile away, I think that the signal strength will be quite good.

If you're in a good signal area then a log will be fine. If (and I say this as your "Plan B" incase Plan A doesn't work) it doesn't have enough gain then you can use the amplifier.

I came across this shop which sells a range of logs for less than £20 including delivery:

Aerials [Aerial Type: Uhf Log-periodic] > AerialSat.com

link to this comment
Dave Lindsay's 5,724 posts GB
J
jamie
sentiment_satisfiedSilver

4:13 PM
Portsmouth

ROY BARTON -

Hi, I am a professional installer who is a digital approved member.

With regards to the log periodic they have flat gain so perform pretty much like a group A aerial. Not one that I would fit, however I have seen them performing well.

Something which people seem to not advise on this site is one simple thing, your signal received can change from location to location, so I would try testing the aerial on different parts of the building, simply moving the aerial a few feet can make all the difference when receiving signal, location is key to making it all work properly.

hope this helps :)

link to this comment
jamie's 207 posts GB
D
Doug Cheney
4:45 PM
Wimborne

ROY BARTON

I live in BH21 1BD and don't have line of sight to Rowridge transmitter, my installer fitted a log periodic in the vertical position with a masthead amp and I get very good reception

link to this comment
Doug Cheney's 1 post GB
J
jb38
sentiment_very_satisfiedPlatinum

5:27 PM

Doug Cheney: An excellent combination that performs well under a whole range of conditions, and unlike the so called high gain types is generally capable of providing a much less glitch prone signal when used in circumstances that could be described as being less than ideal for reception.

The problem a log aerial does have though is "image", as most make the mistake of equating a large structure on their roof as being somewhat superior.

link to this comment
jb38's 7,179 posts GB
R
Roy Barton
5:48 PM
Wimborne

Roy Barton:
I nearly fell out of my chair when the distributor said their Group A aerial was only £6.99 plus VAT. I think it was trade price. He said all the installers use them. I am now confused what a log periodic is. I thought log periodic was the simple aerial with a single boom. (I thought that all aerials were Yagis... but what do I know?) There is so much complexity. I have left the TV on all day displaying signal strength and signal quality. All day long while sun was shining the signal strength was around 99 and the signal quality was fluctuating between 40 and 70. When the sun went down the signal strength dropped to 90 and the signal quality fell to the lowest reading of just 1 (that is the same as 0) but occasionally the signal quality bounces up to 10 or 14 for a minute or so before returning to 0.

This is all very curious. I really intend to experiment with V polarisation using the tri boom and the cheapy just out of interest. Unfortunately I won't be messing with the aerial on the roof as that is inaccessible without cherry pickers or similar. (Or a very light footed installer with good equipment.)

I suspect that the G4 being introduced to Southampton my be the culprit?

My signal has to pass through the pylons of thw national grid half a mile away and some large conifers... but these were never a problem.

link to this comment
Roy Barton's 13 posts GB
J
jamie
sentiment_satisfiedSilver

6:43 PM
Portsmouth

ROY BARTON=

If you use a group A aerial and avoid using an amplifier you should not have issues with 4G

:)

link to this comment
jamie's 207 posts GB
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