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Full Freeview on the Rowridge (Isle Of Wight, England) transmitter

first published this on - UK Free TV
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The symbol shows the location of the Rowridge (Isle Of Wight, England) transmitter which serves 620,000 homes. The bright green areas shown where the signal from this transmitter is strong, dark green areas are poorer signals. Those parts shown in yellow may have interference on the same frequency from other masts.

This transmitter has no current reported problems

The BBC and Digital UK report there are no faults or engineering work on the Rowridge (Isle Of Wight, England) transmitter.

Choose from three options: ■ List by multiplex ■ List by channel number ■ List by channel name
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Which Freeview channels does the Rowridge transmitter broadcast?

If you have any kind of Freeview fault, follow this Freeview reset procedure first.

Digital television services are broadcast on a multiplexes (or Mux) where many stations occupy a single broadcast frequency, as shown below.

MuxH/VFrequencyHeightModeWatts
PSB1
BBCA
 V max
 H max
C24 (498.0MHz)
320mDTG-3200,000W
200,000W
Channel icons
1 BBC One (SD) South, 2 BBC Two England, 9 BBC Four, 23 BBC Three, 201 CBBC, 202 CBeebies, 231 BBC News, 232 BBC Parliament, 250 BBC Red Button, plus 16 others

PSB2
D3+4
 V max
 H max
C27 (522.0MHz)
320mDTG-3200,000W
200,000W
Channel icons
3 ITV (SD) (Meridian (South Coast micro region)), 4 Channel 4 (SD) South ads, 5 Channel 5, 6 ITV 2, 10 ITV3, 13 E4, 14 Film4, 15 Channel 4 +1 South ads, 18 More4, 26 ITV4, 30 E4 +1, 35 ITV +1 (Meridian south coast),

PSB3
BBCB
 V max
 H max
C21+ (474.2MHz)
320mDTG-6200,000W
200,000W
Channel icons
56 5SELECT, 101 BBC One HD (England no regional news), 102 BBC Two HD (England), 103 ITV HD (ITV Meridian Southampton), 104 Channel 4 HD South ads, 105 Channel 5 HD, 106 BBC Four HD, 109 BBC Three HD, 204 CBBC HD, 205 CBeebies HD, plus 1 others

COM4
SDN
 H -6dB
 V -6dB
C25 (506.0MHz)
299mDTG-850,000W
50,000W
Channel icons
12 Quest, 20 Drama, 21 5USA, 29 ITV2 +1, 32 5STAR, 33 5Action, 41 Legend, 42 GREAT! movies action, 46 Channel 5 +1, 58 ITVBe +1, 59 ITV3 +1, 64 Blaze, 67 CBS Reality, 74 Dave ja vu, 78 TCC, 81 Blaze +1, 89 ITV4 +1, 203 CITV, 208 POP MAX, 209 Ketchup TV, 210 Ketchup Too, 211 YAAAS!, plus 15 others

COM5
ArqA
 H -6dB
 V -6dB
C22+ (482.2MHz)
302mDTG-850,000W
50,000W
Channel icons
11 Sky Arts, 17 Really, 19 Dave, 31 E4 Extra, 36 pick, 40 Quest Red, 43 Food Network, 47 Film4 +1, 48 Challenge, 49 4seven, 57 Smithsonian Channel, 60 Drama +1, 70 Quest +1, 75 Yesterday +1, 83 Together TV, 233 Sky News, plus 8 others

COM6
ArqB
 H -6dB
 V -6dB
C28 (530.0MHz)
302mDTG-850,000W
50,000W
Channel icons
 FreeSports, 25 W, 27 Yesterday, 34 GREAT! movies, 39 DMAX, 44 HGTV, 71 Quest Red +1, 73 HobbyMaker, 82 Talking Pictures TV, 84 PBS America, 88 Classic Hits, 235 Aljazeera English, plus 19 others

LSO
 H -13dB
C37 (602.0MHz)299mDTG-1210,000W
Channel icons
from 22nd December 2014: 7 That's Solent,

DTG-3 64QAM 8K 2/3 24.1Mb/s DVB-T MPEG2
DTG-6 256QAM 32KE 2/3 40.2Mb/s DVB-T2 MPEG4
DTG-8 64QAM 8K 3/4 27.1Mb/s DVB-T MPEG2
DTG-12 QSPK 8K 3/4 8.0Mb/s DVB-T MPEG2
H/V: aerial position (horizontal or vertical)

Which BBC and ITV regional news can I watch from the Rowridge transmitter?

regional news image
BBC South Today 1.3m homes 4.9%
from Southampton SO14 7PU, 26km north (354°)
to BBC South region - 39 masts.
regional news image
ITV Meridian News 0.9m homes 3.6%
from Whiteley PO15 7AD, 24km north-northeast (20°)
to ITV Meridian (South Coast) region - 39 masts.
All of lunch, weekend and 50% evening news is shared with all of Meridian plus Oxford

Are there any self-help relays?

Portsmouth DocksTransposer2 km N city centre50 homes Estimate. Group of houses'

How will the Rowridge (Isle Of Wight, England) transmission frequencies change over time?

1950s-80s1984-971997-981998-20122012-132 May 2018
VHFA K TA K TA K TA K TW T
C3BBCtvwaves
C21C4wavesC4wavesC4waves+BBCBBBCB
C22+ArqAArqA
C24BBC2wavesBBC2wavesBBC2wavesBBCABBCA
C25SDNSDN
C27ITVwavesITVwavesITVwavesD3+4D3+4
C28ArqBArqB
C29LSO
C31BBC1wavesBBC1wavesBBC1wavescom7
C37com8
C55tv_offcom7tv_off
C56tv_offCOM8tv_off

tv_off Being removed from Freeview (for 5G use) after November 2020 / June 2022 - more
Table shows multiplexes names see this article;
green background for transmission frequencies
Notes: + and - denote 166kHz offset; aerial group are shown as A B C/D E K W T
waves denotes analogue; digital switchover was 7 Mar 12 and 21 Mar 12.

How do the old analogue and currrent digital signal levels compare?

Analogue 1-4 500kW
PSB1||, PSB1≡, PSB2||, PSB2≡, PSB3||, PSB3≡(-4dB) 200kW
COM4≡, COM4||, COM5≡, COM5||, COM6≡, COM6||(-10dB) 50kW
com7≡(-13.1dB) 24.4kW
Mux 1*, Mux 2*, Mux A*, Mux B*, Mux C*, Mux D*(-14dB) 20kW
com8≡(-14.3dB) 18.4kW
LSO≡(-17dB) 10kW

Which companies have run the Channel 3 services in the Rowridge transmitter area

Aug 1958-Jan 1992Southern Television
Jan 1982-Dec 1992Television South (TVS)
Jan 1993-Feb 2004Meridian
Feb 2004-Dec 2014ITV plc
Feb 1983-Dec 1992TV-am•
Jan 1993-Sep 2010GMTV•
Sep 2010-Dec 2014ITV Daybreak•
• Breakfast ◊ Weekends ♦ Friday night and weekends † Weekdays only. Rowridge was not an original Channel 3 VHF 405-line mast: the historical information shown is the details of the company responsible for the transmitter when it began transmitting Channel 3.

Comments
Monday, 7 January 2013
P
PaulD
8:44 PM
Portsmouth

Hi, I wonder if anyone can help me out. I'm renting a house at PO1 5JP, and I'm trying to troubleshoot a problem with my Freeview signal. I seem to be missing PSB3, COM4 and COM5. COM6 lists a weaker reception than PSB1 and PSB2, but it does work fine. I tried a few things to check what the problem might be, like moving cables around so they were clear of the Coax, but no improvement. I even unplugged the aerial pass-through RF lead from the back of my Freeview+ HD box but that actually made things worse, as I lost COM6 when I did that. Plugging it back in restored COM6. My alternative amplified indoor aerial couldn't get any signal at all when I pointed it straight at Rowridge with the power all the way up. I doubt it's a problem with the box as I was able to tune all the multiplexes with it at my parents' house in Peterborough. Is there anything that any of you can suggest might be the problem? I'm a bit stumped :/

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PaulD's 2 posts GB
Dave Lindsay
sentiment_very_satisfiedPlatinum

10:05 PM

PaulD: PSB3 is the HD one and if you try a manual tune for it, it is UHF channel 21. If there is a setting on the manual tune screen for the mode, ensure that it is set to DVB-T2 rather than DVB-T, the latter being that of Freeview standard definition broadcasts.

Rowridge is unique as a main station because it has used mixed polarisation since switchover. In the days of analogue it was horizontally polarised, like all other main stations. However, following switchover all six channels are on the same power of 200kW vertically whereas the COMs are restricted to 50kW horizontally (with PSBs being 200kW horizontally). The horizontal component is more for backward compatibility with existing aerials.

There is generally no requirement for Rowridge aerials to be replaced as all digital channels are Group A; only switch to vertical polarisation.

In some cases, such as with Sandy Heath, some or all COM channels are outside of the group (which is a part [third] of the frequency band) used for former analogue and hence outside of that which installed aerials work best.

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Dave Lindsay's 5,724 posts GB
Tuesday, 8 January 2013
P
PaulD
1:05 PM
Portsmouth

Hi Dave, thanks for your help. I've now managed to solve the problems by eliminating electrical interference and using a shorter lead, which enabled me to receive COM4 and COM5, and by installing a battery operated aplififier just before the Freeview HD box I was also able to regain access to PSB3. All the channels now working, and I'm a happy camper :D

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PaulD's 2 posts GB
Wednesday, 16 January 2013
C
Christopher Martin James
3:39 PM
Winchester

I have a horizontally polarised aerial fitted to the roof 3 years ago. Reception is occasionally patchy on some channels. Would I do better to switch to vertical polarisation now? Would this require a new aerial,or can the existing one simply be rotated? Many thanks

link to this comment
Christopher Martin James's 1 post GB
Dave Lindsay
sentiment_very_satisfiedPlatinum

3:46 PM

Christopher Martin James: The existing aerial should be fine (assuming it's not damaged of course).

link to this comment
Dave Lindsay's 5,724 posts GB
Friday, 15 February 2013
Idris Martin
10:08 PM

Hi
I live in Weymouth & have fitted a high gain vertically polorised ariel with mast head booster set up by compass bearing then fine tuned with the signal strength meter in the tv's menu.
However,the ststions on multiplex channel 22 keep breaking up, signal strength ok, but quality poor except on a sunny day when it is ok.
Can somebody explain why the other multiplex channels ore ok but not channel 22.


link to this comment
Idris Martin's 16 posts GB
Dave Lindsay
sentiment_very_satisfiedPlatinum

10:31 PM

Idris Martin: Because different frequencies are affected by objects in the path to differing degrees. Different frequencies radiate slightly differently from the transmitter.

You have a quality issue. The fact that it is OK on a sunny day suggests that there is vegetation somewhere in the path.

The terrain plot shows that the Purbeck Hills are in the way and so you have no where near line of sight. For that reason I think that a high-gain aerial is likely not to be the best device.

The higher the gain, the narrower the acceptance "beam". As you aren't anywhere near line of sight, you don't have anything to aim at. Rather, your objective is to pick up what you can.

As digital reception requires good quality (digits intact) a wider acceptance angle could perhaps give better results. It stands to reason that if the quality of the signal across a wider angle is better than across a narrower one then reception is better, even though a lower gain aerial has been used. You can increase the signal strength with an amplifier, but you can't repair its quality.

If it is a wideband high-gain aerial then it isn't "high" gain on the channels you are trying to receive as the gain of wideband yagi aerials drops off on lower channels.

As you have no where near line of sight then it might be worth trying turning the aerial a bit to see if it improves it.

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Dave Lindsay's 5,724 posts GB
Saturday, 16 February 2013
R
Roy Barton
3:08 PM
Wimborne

For years we had perfect reception at BH21 7BT. Over the last few months it has degraded. I recently rescanned all the channels and it was puzzling why BBC1HD should have moved from ch 50 to ch101. But tht is trivial compared to our real problem. As a qualified electronics engineer I can't understand why signal strength and quality for BBC on Channel 24 is 99% but signal strength of Film4 on channel 28 is almost non existent on a good day as measured by our sharp TV signal strnegth is high but n a bad day quality is down to 1% or no signal at all. I have advice that we should rotate our aerial so that is is Vertical polarisation. We have not tried it yet. WE are confused as the UKfree.tv website indicates that Rowridge is H. But there are clues that it might be also V. Any info on this is very confusing, probably because some info on your website is out of date.
Please clarify. Should we continue pointing at rowridge and rotate our aerial through 90 degrees so the dipoles are vertical? I guess we should be using a type A aerial. Would you confirm that a wideband aerial is not to be recommended for our location.

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Roy Barton's 13 posts GB
Dave Lindsay
sentiment_very_satisfiedPlatinum

3:45 PM

Roy Barton: The short answer is yes, rotate your aerial for vertical polarisation with Rowridge; there isn't, generally, a requirement to replace the aerial. The information at the top of this page is correct and says that each multiplex is broadcast horizontally and vertically.

The gain (sensitivity) of yagi aerials drops on lower channels. A wideband yagi is a greater compromise than a Group one as by the time you get down to Group A channels the gain is low. Manufacturers will quote the gain on the highest channel which is likely to be not what you're using it for. Rowridge is all Group A, so for that reason if you use a yagi then use a Group A one. For example gain curves that illustrate the point, see:

Gain (curves), Again


Above it does say "To receive Freeview from the Rowridge transmitter you will require an aerial of group A positioned horizontally." I will alert the site administrator to see if it can be changed.


The longer explanation: There are the PSB (Public Service) channels and there are the COM (Commercial) channels. The COMs don't have as extensive a coverage as the PSBs. This is due mainly to the fact that small relays don't carry them, but there will also be a few who won't get them reliably even though they use a transmitter that broadcasts them.

Basically, the PSB-network is designed to serve all areas that the former four-channel analogue network did and without requirement for existing aerials to be adjusted or replaced. The COM transmitters fit in where they can and in some cases require a replacement aerial, or in the case of Rowridge, vertical polarisation may be beneficial.

Rowridge broadcasts horizontally so as to be backward-compatible with existing aerials.

Because the COM channels fit in where they can, the channels that are used for them are reused by other transmitters in closer proximity than those of the PSB channels. Rowridge's COMs are co-channel with those of Stockland Hill's in the west and Crystal Palace's in the east. This is the reason that Rowridge's COMs are effectively restricted power horizontally; it's so they don't spread as far. Turning your aerial for vertical polarisation will increase the "rejection" of the unwanted Stockland signals (which are only horizontal).

Vertical polarisation may also reduce co-channel interference during lift conditions. Like the UK, France uses horizontal polarisation for high-power transmitters. (Rowridge being the one exception.)

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Dave Lindsay's 5,724 posts GB
R
Roy Barton
11:24 PM
Wimborne

John Lindsay. Thank you for your answer. Can I assume that a wide band aerial would be a definite bad choice?. (I bought one just today **** )
I also purchased a Labgear aerial amplifier. In the blurb it states it is for terrestial digital TV DTT and radio T-DAB and no mention of DVB-T. Is it safe to assume that a MSA111 would not degrade the signal in any way. (Other than when it might be overloaded) ?

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Roy Barton's 13 posts GB
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